Psychology

Your point of view on yourself is distorted

Your “self” lies before you like an open book. Look close and read through your mind: who you are, your likes and dislikes, your expectation and terror, they are in the position, ready to be perceived.  This concept is popular but is probably completely wrong!

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Introspection Illusion.

 

Psychological research shows that we do not have the rights to access to who we are. When we try to assess ourselves accurately, we are really poking around in a fog.

Emily Pronin, the psychologist of Princeton University, who specializes in human self-perception and decision making, calls the mistaken belief in privileged access the “introspection illusion.”

The way we view ourselves is distorted, but we do not realize it. As a result, our self-image has surprisingly little to do with our actions. For example, we may be absolutely convinced that we are empathetic and generous but still walk right past a homeless person on a cold day.

According to Pronin, the reason for this distorted view is quite simple. Because we do not want to be stingy, arrogant or self-righteous, we assume that we are not any of those things. As evidence, she points to our divergent views of ourselves and others.

We have no trouble recognizing how prejudiced or unfair our office colleague acts toward another person. But we do not consider that we could behave in much the same way: because we intend to be morally good, it never occurs to us that we, too, might be prejudiced.

Pronin assessed her thesis in a number of experiments. Among other things, she had her study participants complete a test involving matching faces with personal statements that would supposedly assess their social intelligence. Afterward, some of them were told that they had failed and were asked to name weaknesses in the testing procedure.

Although the opinions of the subjects were almost certainly biased (not only had they supposedly failed the test, they were also being asked to critique it), most of the participants said their evaluations were completely objective.

It was much the same in judging works of art, although subjects who used a biased strategy for assessing the quality of paintings nonetheless believed that their own judgment was balanced. Pronin argues that we are primed to mask our own biases.Related image

Is the word “introspection” merely a nice metaphor? Could it be that we are not really looking into ourselves, as the Latin root of the word suggests, but producing a flattering self-image that denies the failings that we all have?

The research on self-knowledge has yielded much evidence for this conclusion. Although we think we are observing ourselves clearly, our self-image is affected by processes that remain unconscious.

Further reading on Scientific American.

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